by Dean Witherspoon   Dean's profile on LinkedIn  


Wellness practitioners can easily fall into thinking that because what we do is good for others, we should always be welcomed with open arms. Unfortunately, the opposite can be true in a potential client’s mind — they may be more suspicious of your motives because their health and habits are personal issues, so why should someone else even care, much less want them to change? Until you earn their respect, there’s a good chance your message will be viewed with doubt or even distrust. Some suggestions…


  • Recognize their intelligence. Flipping through the late night cable channels gives you plenty examples of health messages that don’t acknowledge audience intelligence. Never sensationalize to gain attention for your health promotion program.
by Dean Witherspoon   Dean's profile on LinkedIn  


Hiring a service provider is every bit as important — maybe more so — than hiring a new employee. Yet we often run into potential clients who have had a bad experience with another vendor and so are naturally skeptical that we can or will do what we say we can do — even though they’ve had no prior experience with us.


It’s more common than you think, as wellness vendors routinely over-promise and under-deliver. To these doubters, we always encourage them to talk to current or previous clients. And for those considering any wellness vendor’s service, here are some questions and things to look for as part of your evaluation and due diligence process. The goal is to end up with exactly the right provider for your organization.

by Dean Witherspoon   Dean's profile on LinkedIn  


Be honest about it, behavior change is tough.

If you’re like some health promoters you may have backed off long-term classroom-based programming or other services that require considerable commitment by the participant. Time constraints and anxiety over constant changes in the workplace have made us hesitant to ask much from participants. The results are health promotion services in bits and pieces — they’re easy to swallow but don’t stick to your ribs. You may create some awareness, but behavior change is modest at best.