by Dean Witherspoon   Dean's profile on LinkedIn  


Depending on the behavior change it can take multiple attempts (at least 2 or more) — at quitting smoking, losing weight, starting exercise, managing stress — before a participant experiences long-term success and real commitment. You can’t rush this, but you can help people get off the fence so they can reach commitment on their own, and ultimately achieve the goal of long-term behavior change. Here’s how…

by Dean Witherspoon   Dean's profile on LinkedIn  


I’ve been railing against the best practice notion for the last year (read Avoiding the Comparison Trap of “Best Practice” and 3 Meaningless Health Management Phrases). In part it’s because results achieved with what passes for best in wellness — from needs assessments to environmental audits to structure to incentives — have been only marginally better than those from programming that makes no attempt to reach these bars.

by Dean Witherspoon   Dean's profile on LinkedIn  


The Republican primaries are underway. As the field of candidates narrows, you’ll see the gloves come off, with candidates taking more and more cheap shots at each other and the Obama administration in public appearances, debates, and especially ads.


But incivility isn’t limited to politicians. Athletes, entertainers, talk show hosts, motorists, and even grade school children exhibit an in-your-face attitude that says “I can treat you however I choose… just try to stop me.” The popularity of Two and a Half Men (the Charlie Sheen era), Jersey Shore, and Family Guy reflects a culture that accepts, even admires, rude behavior.